CSCAA Names 100 Greatest Men’s College Swimmers & Divers in History

CSCAA Names 100 Greatest Men’s College Swimmers & Divers in History (Full Bios Included)

A total of 627 titles. That is the number of individual NCAA and NAIA championships of the College Swimming & Diving Coaches Association’s (CSCAA) 100 Greatest Men’s Swimmers & Divers of the past century. The selections were made as a part of the CSCAA’s 100th year.

Nearly three thousand athletes were nominated, with a blue-ribbon panel of current and former college swimmers, coaches, and members of the media making selections from a list of 973 finalists. Eighty-six swimmers and fourteen divers were selected. They hail from twenty-eight states and thirteen countries. Highlights of the selections include 12 members of the International Swimming Hall of Fame and 59 Olympians.

Founded in 1922, the College Swimming and Diving Coaches Association of America (CSCAA), is the nation’s first organization of college coaches. The mission of the CSCAA is to advance the sport of swimming and diving with coaches at the epicenter of leadership, advocacy, and professional development.

The CSCAA’s 100th birthday celebration will continue with upcoming announcements recognizing Centennial MVP’s for each team along with a listing of the 100 Greatest Coaches, 100 Alumni of Impact. The anniversary will culminate with the Association’s convention and awards banquet, May 2-4, 2022 in Rosemont, Illinois.

The CSCAA100 list of Greatest College Swimmers and Divers is listed below in alphabetical order. For profiles on each selection visit www.cscaa.org/cscaa100

• Top 100 Women’s Swimmers and Divers

Nathan Adrian

University of California – Bremerton, OR
One of the swimming world’s most prolific sprinters, Adrian captured five NCAA individual titles and led California to the 2011 NCAA Division I team Championship. An eight-time Olympic medalist, Adrian was named the 2011 CSCAA Swimmer-of-the-Year and was a two-time Pac-10 Swimmer-of-the-Year and a two-time CoSIDA Academic All-American in 2010 and 2011.

  • National Titles: 2009: 50 Free 18.71, 100 Free 41.08 / 2010: 100 Free 41.5 / 2011: 50 Free 18.66, 100 Free 41.1
  • Other: 2011 Swimmer of the Year / 3x Champion 100 Free

Ernie Alix

North Central College – Lockport, NY
Alix helped make North Central into a small-college powerhouse. The Cardinals captured the 1958 NAIA championship, with Alix leading a 1-2-3 finish in the 200 butterfly. He went on to win three more national titles. Alix also set an American record in the 220 butterfly at the 1957 National Junior Amateur Athletic Union Championships.

  • National Titles: 1958: 200 Fly 2:25.60 / 1959: 200 Fly 2:19.60, 200 IM 2:20.70 / 1960: 200 Fly 2:14.60
  • Other: 3x Champion 200 Fly

Miller Anderson

The University of Ohio State – Columbus, OH
Anderson represents one of the most remarkable comebacks in sports history. While piloting his 112th mission, Anderson was shot down and captured by German forces. The crash and subsequent surgery nearly cost him his leg, but he persevered and went on to win five NCAA titles for the Buckeyes. As a senior, he was named outstanding swimmer by the CSCAA and later represented the United States at the 1948 and 1952 Olympics.

  • National Titles: 1946: 1 Meter 101.96, 3 Meter 118.1 / 1947: 1 Meter 151.1, 3 Meter 172.62 / 1948: 3 Meter 174.34
  • Other: 1946 & 1947 Diver of the Year / 3x Champion 3 Meter

Joel Ax

SCAD Savannah – Idstein, Germany
The most-dominant freestyler in NAIA history, Ax swept the 200, 500 and 1650 freestyle in each of his first three years. As a junior, he posted the NAIA’s fastest time in the 50, 100, 200, 500 and 1650 freestyles, before capturing the 100 and 200 freestyles as a senior. In total, the two-time NAIA Swimmer-of-the-Year captured 19 national titles and 29 All-American awards.

  • National Titles: 2014: 200 Free 1:36.71, 500 Free 4:25.67, 1650 Free 15:30.09 / 2015: 200 Free 1:36.82, 500 Free 4:21.93, 1650 Free 15:32.20 / 2016: 200 Free 1:36.85, 500 Free 4:26.33, 1650 Free 15:19.50 / 2017: 100 Free 43.56, 200 Free 1:34.89
  • Other: 2016 NAIA Swimmer of the Year / 3x Champion 1650 Free, 4x Champion 200 Free

Matt Biondi

University of California – Morgana, CA
One of the greatest freestyle swimmers in American history, Biondi won a dozen NCAA and fourteen Pac-10 titles during his career. Over his career, Biondi set another dozen world records, captured 11 Olympic medals, and became the first man under 49 seconds in the 100m freestyle. He was named the U.S. Olympic Committee Sportsman-of-the-Year in 1986 and 1988.

  • National Titles: 1985: 100 Free 41.87, 200 Free 1:33.22 / 1986: 50 Free 19.22, 100 Free 42.03, 200 Free 1:33.85 / 1987: 50 Free 19.15, 100 Free 41.8, 200 Free 1:33.03
  • Other: 3x Champion 100 Free, 3x Champion 200 Free

 

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Charles Bittick

University of Southern California – El Reno, Canada
Bittick was one USC’s greatest two-sport aquatic athletes, winning four NCAA individual titles, helping the Trojans win the 1960 NCAA Team Championship and captaining the 1961 squad which placed second. He also won six AAU individual crowns, five Pac-10 titles and was a three-time All-American. Bittick represented the United States at the 1960 Olympics in Water Polo.

  • National Titles: 1960: 100 Back 54.4, 200 Back 2:00.10 / 1961: 100 Back 53.9, 200 Back 1:57.10

Richard Blick

North Central College – Los Angeles, CA
An Olympic champion, and former world record-holder, Blick captured eleven national titles at North Central. He was named NAIA Swimmer-of-the-Year as a Junior and Senior following record-setting wins in the 100, 200, and 440 freestyle. In 1960, Blick set an Olympic record in the 200-meter freestyle as a part of the United States’ gold-medal-winning 800-meter freestyle relay.

  • National Titles: 1959: 100 Free 51, 200 Free 2:05.80, 440 Free 4:41.80 / 1960: 200 Free 2:08.60, 440 Free 4:42.10 / 1961: 100 Free 51, 200 Free 2:04.40, 440 Free 4:33.90 / 1962: 100 Free 49.6, 200 Free 2:03.00, 440 Free 4:31.40
  • Other: 1961 & 1962 NAIA Swimmer of the Year / 3x Champion 100 Free, 4x Champion 200 Free, 4x Champion 500 Free

Gustavo Borges

University of Michigan – Ituverava, Sao Paola, Brazil
Borges won eight NCAA individual titles was a 24-time CSCAA All-American and captured 20-time Big Ten champion. Borges led Michigan to the 1995 NCAA team championship and four straight Big Ten titles. A four-time Olympian, Borges is the first Brazilian swimmer to claim more than one Olympic swimming medal. He was inducted into the International Swimming Hall of Fame in 2012.

  • National Titles: 1992: 100 Free 42.95, 200 Free 1:34.66 / 1993: 100 Free 42.91 / 1994: 100 Free 42.46, 200 Free 1:34.31 / 1995: 50 Free 19.68, 100 Free 42.85, 200 Free 1:34.61
  • Other: 4x Champion 100 Free, 3x Champion 200 Free

James Born

Kenyon College – Edgewood, MD
Born was a 16-time NCAA event champion and an All-American in 24 events, setting 13 Division III records in the process. He also became the first Division III swimmer to earn Division I All-America honors for his eighth-place finish at the 1986 Division I championship. Born was twice named CSCAA Division III Swimmer-of-the-Year and a member of the United States national team from 1985 to 1987.

  • National Titles: 1984: 100 Free 44.76, 100 Fly 50 / 1985: 50 Free 19.97, 100 Free 43.65, 100 Fly 49.57 / 1986: 50 Free 20.09, 100 Free 43.96
  • Other: 1985 & 1986 Division 3 Swimmer of the Year / 3x Champion 100 Free

Joshua Boss

Hope College – Jenison, MI
Boss was the most dominant breaststroker of his era. He claimed seven NCAA men’s championships, sweeping the 200 breaststroke all four years and capturing the 100 breaststroke as a freshman, junior and senior. Boss set national records in both events in 1999 and the 200 breaststroke in 2001 when he was selected as CSCAA Division III Swimmer-of-the-Year.

  • National Titles: 1999: 100 Breast 54.69, 200 Breast 2:00.53 / 2000: 200 Breast 2:02.12 / 2001: 100 Breast 54.7, 200 Breast 1:58.90 / 2002: 100 Breast 54.77, 200 Breast 1:59.38
  • Other: 3x Champion 100 Breast, 4x Champion 200 Breast

Joe Bottom

University of Southern California – Akron, OH
Bottom contributed to three USC National Championship teams (1974-75-77), won nine NCAA titles (five individual, four relay) and was a 20-time All-American. In 1977 he captained USC’s undefeated national championship team and became the first college swimmer ever to crack 20 seconds in the 50 free (19.70). Bottom also won eight Pac-10 titles (six individual, two relay).

  • National Titles: 1974: 100 Free 45.067 / 1975: 50 Free 20.118 / 1976: 50 Free 20.08 / 1977: 50 Free 19.75, 100 Fly 47.77
  • Other: 3x Champion 50 Free

David Boudia

Purdue University – Noblesville, IN
Before becoming an Olympic champion, Boudia captured six NCAA titles and nine Big Ten championships. The three-time Purdue Male Athlete-of-the-Year became the first diver to win the Jesse Owens Big Ten Male Athlete-of-the-Year Award and was also a three-time CSCAA Diver-of-the-Year honoree before turning pro following his junior season.

  • National Titles: 2009: 3 Meter 813.1, Platform 850.45 / 2010: 1 Meter 748.65, 3 Meter 814.9 / 2011: 1 Meter 741, 3 Meter 752.3
  • Other: 2009, 2010 & 20112011 Diver of the Year / 3x Champion 3 Meter

Fred Bousquet

Auburn University – Perpignan, France
At the 2005 NCAA Championships, Bousquet became the first man ever to swim the 50 freestyle in under 19 seconds, shattering Tom Jager’s fifteen year-old record by 0.31 seconds. It was the third of his three titles in the event, to go along with three additional relay titles. A four-time Olympian, Bousquet also captured 15 SEC championships with the Tigers.

  • National Titles: 2003: 50 Free 19.31 / 2004: 50m Free 21.1 / 2005: 50 Free 18.9
  • Other: 3x Champion 50 Free

Ralph Breyer

Northwestern University – Chicago, IL
With Breyer on their team, Northwestern University captured two NCAA and three Big Ten titles and was undefeated in dual meets. Breyer won the first NCAA title (1924) in the 100 freestyle before going on to win Olympic gold, with teammate Richard Howell in the 800-meter freestyle relay. A year later, Breyer repeated as 100 freestyle champion and earned the 1925 Big Ten Medal of Honor.

  • National Titles: 1924: 100m Free 1:01.60, 200m Free 2:27.60 / 1925: 100 Free 55

Skippy Browning

University of Texas – Dallas, TX
The six-time diving All-American posted a three-year unbeaten streak in dual meet competitions while competing for the Longhorns. Browning won two NCAA and Southwest Conference titles while helping Texas win three consecutive SWC titles. Browning won gold on the 3-meter springboard at the 1952 Olympics and was the first of many Longhorns to be inducted into the International Swimming Hall of Fame,

  • National Titles: 1951: 1 Meter 131.43, 3 Meter 144.75 / 1952: 1 Meter 324.2, 3 Meter 586.4
  • Other: 1951 & 1952 Diver of the Year

Ondrej Bures

California State University-Bakersfield – Prague, Czechoslovakia
Bures was an integral part of four NCAA Division II Championship teams. He won nine individual titles in four different events, including three career titles in both the 400 individual medley and the 1650 freestyle. Bures also won a pair of championships in the 200 Butterfly and one in the 500 freestyle and represented Czechoslovakia at the 1988 Seoul Olympic Games. Sadly, Bures was struck and killed by a car in 1999.

  • National Titles: 1990: 500 Free 4:27.81, 1650 Free 15:21.72, 200 Fly 1:48.40, 400 IM 3:54.79 / 1992: 1650 Free 15:33.85, 200 Fly 1:48.39, 400 IM 3:55.84 / 1993: 1650 Free 15:38.00, 200 Fly 1:48.72, 400 IM 3:55.27
  • Other: 1990 Division 2 Swimmer of the Year / 3x Champion 1650 Free, 3x Champion 200 Fly, 3x Champion 400 IM

Simon Burnett

University of Arizona – Oxford, Great Britain
In 2006 Burnett broke Matt Biondi’s 19-year-old record in the 200 freestyle. It was his third championship for the Wildcats and would last a full decade before being broken again. He twice represented Great Britain in the Olympics.

  • National Titles: 2003: 200 Free 1:33.69 / 2005: 200 Free 1:33.28 / 2006: 200 Free 1:31.20
  • Other: 3x Champion 200 Free

Mike Burton

UCLA – Sacramento, CA
A three-time Olympic Gold Medalist, Burton, was one of the world’s greatest distance swimmers He was a five-time NCAA champion with three wins in the 1650 freestyle and a four-time Pac-10 champion. He helped lead the Bruins to the 1970 Pac-10 Championship and is a member of the International Swimming Hall of Fame. Burton, and daughter Loni are the only father-daughter duo selected to the CSCAA list of 100 Greatest Swimmers.

  • National Titles: 1967: 1650 Free 16:17.59 / 1968: 1650 Free 15:59.34 / 1970: 500 Free 4:37.29, 1650 Free 16:10.59, 200 Fly 1:51.60
  • Other: 1970 Swimmer of the Year / 3x Champion 1650 Free

Rick Carey

University of Texas – Mt. Kisco, NY
The five-time NCAA champion captured three-straight titles in the 200 backstroke, setting NCAA records each time. Carey led the Longhorns to SWC Championships from 1982-84 and was a Sullivan Award finalist in 1983. Carey captured a pair of gold medals in the 1984 Olympics and established American records in both events. A decade later he was inducted into the International Swimming Hall of Fame.

  • National Titles: 1982: 200 Back 1:46.01 / 1983: 100 Back 48.25, 200 Back 1:45.21 / 1984: 100 Back 48.63, 200 Back 1:44.82
  • Other: 3x Champion 200 Back

Cesar Cielo

Auburn University – São Paulo, Brazil
At Auburn, Cesar Cielo won four individual NCAA titles, twice sweeping the 50 and 100 freestyle events at the NCAA Championships. A two-time CSCAA Swimmer-of-the-Year, Cielo is the most successful Brazilian swimmer in history having earned three Olympic medals and six individual World Championships.

  • National Titles: 2007: 50 Free 18.69, 100 Free 41.17 / 2008: 50 Free 18.52, 100 Free 40.92
  • Other: 2007 & 2008 Swimmer of the Year

Steve Clark

Yale University – Los Altos, CA
Clark accomplished many firsts in his career. The five-time NCAA Champion was the world’s first man to swim faster than 48, 47 and 46 seconds in the 100 freestyle and the first man to go under 21 seconds in the 50 freestyle. Clark was a part of three gold-medal relays at the 1964 Tokyo Olympics and was inducted into the International Swimming Hall of Fame in 1966.

  • National Titles: 1963: 200 Free 1:46.30 / 1964: 100 Free 46.3, 200 Free 1:44.40 / 1965: 50 Free 21.2, 100 Free 46.1

Tyler Clary

University of Michigan – Riverside, CA
Clary won three national titles while swimming for Michigan, taking the 200 backstroke in 2009 and winning the 400 individual medley in 2009 and 2010. Clary captured six individual Big Ten titles, two Big Ten Swimmer-of-the-Year awards, and was named 2009 CSCAA Swimmer-of-the-Year before going on to win a gold medal in the 200-meter backstroke at the 2012 Olympics.

  • National Titles: 2009: 200 Back 1:37.58, 400 IM 3:35.98 / 2010: 400 IM 3:38.89
  • Other: 2009 Swimmer of the Year

Kevin Cordes

University of Arizona – Naperville, IL
A two-time CSCAA Swimmer-of-the-Year, Cordes collected thirteen All-America nods over his career. He captured the 100 breaststroke in each of his four seasons and in 2013 he became the first man to go under 1:49 in the 200 breaststroke. Cordes finaled at the 2016 Olympic games and helped Team USA to gold in the 400-meter medley relay.

  • National Titles: 2012: 100 Breast 51.71 / 2013: 100 Breast 50.74, 200 Breast 1:48.68 / 2014: 100 Breast 50.04, 200 Breast 1:48.66 / 2015: 100 Breast 50.25
  • Other: 2013 & 2014 Swimmer of the Year / 4x Champion 100 Breast

Alan Corrigan

North Central College – Rockford, IL
Corrigan bypassed Big Ten offers to attend North Central in order to be eligible to compete as a freshman. He capitalized on the opportunity to win the 200 individual medley and help the Cardinals to a win in the 400 medley relay. A year later he added wins in the 200 and 500 freestyle and helped North Central win their third national title.

  • National Titles: 1962: 200 IM 2:11.90 / 1963: 200 Free 1:52.50, 500 Free 5:15.30, 200 IM 2:07.60

Marc Courtney-Brooks

Kenyon College – Columbus, OH
Over the course of five different events, Courtney-Brooks captured seven individual NCAA titles in addition to sixteen relay championships. Courtney-Brooks was a Falkenstine Award recipient, Kenyon’s Senior Athlete-of-the-Year in 2004, an NCAA Postgraduate Scholarship winner and a three-time CSCAA Division III Swimmer-of-the-Year.

  • National Titles: 2002: 100 Free 44.8, 100 Fly 49.11 / 2003: 100 Free 44.51, 200 Free 1:36.98, 500 Free 4:23.28 / 2004: 100 Free 44.23, 200 IM 1:47.72
  • Other: 2002, 2003 & 2004 Division 3 Swimmer of the Year / 3x Champion 100 Free

Ian Crocker

University of Texas – Portland, ME
A dominant butterfly swimmer, Crocker led Texas to a pair of NCAA team titles, won three Olympic gold medals and held the 100m butterfly world record for six years. During his time at Texas, he won 10 NCAA individual titles, 24 All-America honors, 21 Big 12 titles and was named 2004 CSCAA Swimmer-of-the-Year.

  • National Titles: 2001: 100 Fly 45.96 / 2002: 100 Fly 45.44 / 2003: 100 Fly 45.67 / 2004: 100m Free 46.25, 100m Fly 49.07
  • Other: 2004 Swimmer of the Year / 4x Champion 100 Fly

Dario DiFazio

Oakland University – Caracas, Venezuela
In just two seasons at Oakland, DiFazio became a national champion three times, was titled CSCAA Division II Diver-of-the-Year and a vital part of two national team championships. At one time, the two-time Venezuelan Olympian held every school, pool, and GLIAC record in both the one-meter and three-meter boards

  • National Titles: 1994: 1 Meter 618.7, 3 Meter 556.4 / 1995: 3 Meter 556.65
  • Other: 1994 Division 2 Diver of the Year

Gary Dilley

Michigan State University – Huntington, IN
Recruited to MSU by the legendary coach Charles McCaffree, Dilley captured four NCAA titles for the Spartans. Dilley swept the 100 and 200 backstrokes in 1965 and 1966 and set three NCAA records in the process. Dilley’s freshman roommate was former NFL All-pro Gene Washington and both are members of the Michigan State hall of fame.

  • National Titles: 1965: 100 Back 52.6, 200 Back 1:56.20 / 1966: 100 Back 52.39, 200 Back 1:56.41

Tom Dolan

University of Michigan – Arlington, VA
A nine-time NCAA Champion, with six individual titles, Dolan was one of the most dominant swimmers of his era. Dolan won back-to-back titles in the 500 freestyle, 1650 freestyle, and 400 individual medley. His 500 freestyle mark of 4:08.75 stood as the American record for eleven years. The two-time Olympian won the 400-meter individual medley in both 1996 and 2000 games.

  • National Titles: 1995: 500 Free 4:08.75, 1650 Free 14:29.31, 400 IM 3:38.18 / 1996: 500 Free 4:12.77, 1650 Free 14:38.37, 400 IM 3:41.44
  • Other: 1995 Swimmer of the Year

Caeleb Dressel

University of Florida – Green Cove, FL
Following his freshman year, Dressel, a three-time CSCAA Swimmer-of-the-Year, never finished lower than second in NCAA or SEC competition. Dressel captured nine individual NCAA titles, breaking nine NCAA records. Dressel won 13 individual SEC titles and 20 titles overall en route to three SEC Swimmer-of-the-Year honors.

  • National Titles: 2015: 50 Free 18.67 / 2016: 50 Free 18.2, 100 Free 40.46 / 2017: 50 Free 18.23, 100 Free 40, 100 Fly 43.58 / 2018: 50 Free 17.63, 100 Free 39.9, 100 Fly 42.8
  • Other: 2016, 2017 & 2018 Swimmer of the Year / 4x Champion 50 Free, 3x Champion 100 Free

Andrejs Duda

Kenyon College – Jelgava, Latvia
Duda, along with UC San Diego’s Travis Miller, is the winningest swimmer in NCAA Division III history. The Latvian Olympian captured nine individual and fifteen relay titles. Duda won three straight NCAA titles in the 100 butterfly, and three titles in both the 200 butterfly and 200 individual medley. Duda was named the CSCAA Division III Swimmer-of-the-Year in 2006 and to NCAC’s 30th Anniversary All-Decade Team.

  • National Titles: 2003: 100 Fly 48.64, 200 Fly 1:46.41, 200 IM 1:49.24 / 2004: 100 Fly 48.07, 200 Fly 1:47.32 / 2005: 100 Fly 49.38, 200 IM 1:49.18 / 2006: 200 Fly 1:47.72, 200 IM 1:48.64
  • Other: 2006 Division 3 Swimmer of the Year / 3x Champion 100 Fly, 3x Champion 200 Fly, 3x Champion 200 IM

Troy Dumais

University of Texas – Ventura, CA
Dumais was a four-time Olympian for the United States, winning the bronze medal in the 3-meter synchronized springboard at the 2012 London Olympics. Dumais won seven individual National Championships and earned All-America honors four straight years. Dumais was the first diver in NCAA history to claim four consecutive titles on the 3-meter springboard.

  • National Titles: 1999: 3 Meter 688.7 / 2000: 1 Meter 605.2, 3 Meter 662.65 / 2001: 1 Meter 397.6, 3 Meter 664.7 / 2002: 1 Meter 390.35, 3 Meter 673.8
  • Other: 2000, 2001 & 2002 Diver of the Year / 3x 1m Champion, 4x Champioin 3 Meter

Graham Duthie

Simon Fraser University — Canada
Duthie owns more individual national titles than any other male swimmer. He was a perfect 12-for-12 over his career capturing four consecutive titles in the 100 and 200 freestyles and three in the 400/500 freestyle. He was a part of three NAIA Championship teams, sixteen relay titles, and a part of fifteen championship records.

  • National Titles: 1997: 50 Free 20.66, 100 Free 44.73, 200 Free 1:38.69 / 1998: 100 Free 44.9, 200 Free 1:39.18, 500 Free 4:34.61 / 1999: 100 Free 44.63, 200 Free 1:38.64, 500 Free 4:34.06 / 2001: 100m Free 49.33, 200m Free 1:49.33, 400m Free 3:56.72
  • Other: 1998, 1999, 2000 & 2001 NAIA Swimmer of the Year / 4x Champion 100 Free, 4x Champion 200 Free, 3x Champion 500 Free

David Edgar

University of Tennessee – Fort Lauderdale, FL
Named “Fastest Man Afloat” by Sports Illustrated, Edgar was a seven-time NCAA Champion who swept the 50 and 100 freestyles in 1970, 1971 and 1972. On the international stage, he was part of the world-record 400 free relay team that brought home gold for Team USA at the 1972 Olympic Games and was inducted into the International Swimming Hall of Fame in 1996.

  • National Titles: 1970: 50 Free 20.93, 100 Free 46.06 / 1971: 50 Free 20.3, 100 Free 44.69 / 1972: 50 Free 20.442, 100 Free 45.003
  • Other: 3x Champion 50 Free, 3x Champion 100 Free

Anthony Ervin

University of California – Valencia, CA
Ervin was a three-time NCAA champion in the 100 free and voted the Pac-12 Swimmer-of-the-Year in 2002. He also claimed NCAA event titles in the 50 free and on the 400 medley relay as a freshman and on the 400 free relay as a junior. Ervin is a four-time Olympic medalist and in 2016 became the oldest individual Olympic gold-medal winner in swimming.

  • National Titles: 2000: 50m Free 21.21, 100m Free 47.36 / 2001: 100 Free 41.8 / 2002: 100 Free 41.62
  • Other: 3x Champion 100 Free

Alan Ford

Yale University – Sarasota, FL
A legendary swimmer, Ford broke Johnny Weissmuller’s long-standing record in the 100 freestyle and became the first swimmer to break 50 seconds in 100 yards. In 1944, he won NCAA titles in the 50 and 100 freestyle and 150 backstroke and four years later won a silver medal at the 1948 London Olympics. He was inducted into the International Swimming Hall of Fame with fellow Yalie Steve Clark in 1966.

  • National Titles: 1944: 50 Free 22.2, 100 Free 49.7, 150 Back 1:36.80 /
  • Other: 1944 Swimmer of the Year

Lars Frolander

Southern Methodist University – Boden, Sweden
A six-time Olympian, Frolander was the 1998 CSCAA Swimmer-of-the-Year following wins in the 100 freestyle and 100 butterfly. A year before, he captured the same two events and as a freshman added a title in the 100 butterfly. At the 2000 Olympics he won the 100-meter butterfly and added silver medals in the 1992 and 1996 800-meter freestyle relays. He is a member of the SMU Athletics Hall of Fame class of 2013.

  • National Titles: 1995: 100 Fly 46.18 / 1997: 100 Free 42.89, 100 Fly 46.28 / 1998: 100 Free 42.12, 100 Fly 45.99
  • Other: 1998 Swimmer of the Year / 3x Champion 100 Fly

Rowdy Gaines

Auburn University – Winter Haven, FL
A 22-time All-American selection, Ambrose “Rowdy” Gaines was considered the top freestyle swimmer in the world during his time at Auburn. He won eight NCAA championships, five as an individual, and 14 SEC championships. Gaines went on to win three Olympic gold medals and was later inducted into the International Swimming Hall of Fame.

  • National Titles: 1979: 50 Free 19.99 / 1980: 100 Free 43.36, 200 Free 1:34.57 / 1981: 100 Free 42.38, 200 Free 1:33.91

Brian Goodell

UCLA – Stockton, CA
Brian Goodell won nine NCAA titles, capturing the 500 freestyle, 1650 freestyle, and 400 individual medley championships in 1978, 1979, and 1980. The 11-time Pac-10 Champion earned two Pac-10 Swimmer-of-the-Year awards and three CSCAA Swimmer-of-the-Year honors. He is a member of both the UCLA Athletics and International Swimming Halls of Fame.

  • National Titles: 1978: 500 Free 4:18.05, 1650 Free 14:55.53, 400 IM 3:53.61 / 1979: 500 Free 4:16.43, 1650 Free 14:54.13, 400 IM 3:50.80 / 1980: 500 Free 4:17.81, 1650 Free 14:54.07, 400 IM 3:51.38
  • Other: 1978, 1979 & 1980 Swimmer of the Year / 3x Champion 1650 Free, 3x Champion 400 IM

Jeff Gorton

Kalamazoo College – Kalamazoo, MI
Gorton is the most prolific diver in NCAA Division III history, having won five national championships and earning eight All-America honors. Gorton established Division III records on both boards and continues to hold the 3-meter record. He captured every MIAA diving title in his four years and was the 2000 CSCAA Diver-of-the-Year.

  • National Titles: 1997: 3 Meter 501.3 / 1998: 1 Meter 540.3 / 1999: 1 Meter 524.5 / 2000: 1 Meter 510.05, 3 Meter 577.05
  • Other: 2000 Division 3 Diver of the Year / 3x 1m Champion

Townley Haas

University of Texas – Richmond, VA
Haas captured six individual and four relay titles at the NCAA Championships, highlighted by a three-year reign in the 200 freestyle. The seventeen-time All-American was the first man under 1:31 in the 200 freestyle and two years later re-established NCAA, American, US Open and NCAA records with a time of 1:29.50. Haas captured Olympic gold in 2018 as a part of the 800 freestyle relay team.

  • National Titles: 2016: 200 Free 1:30.46, 500 Free 4:09.00 / 2017: 200 Free 1:30.65 / 2018: 200 Free 1:29.50, 500 Free 4:08.60 / 2019: 500 Free 4:08.19
  • Other: 3x Champion 200 Free

Gary Hall

Indiana University – Fayetteville, AR
Gary Hall was part of the final four seasons of Indiana’s run of six straight national championships from 1968-1973. He contributed a total of seven individual NCAA titles. He especially excelled in the individual medley, winning five medals between the 200 and 400 events. In 1981, he was inducted into the International Swimming Hall of Fame.

  • National Titles: 1970: 400 IM 4:07.31 / 1971: 200 Back 1:50.60, 200 IM 1:52.20, 400 IM 3:58.25 / 1972: 200 IM 1:51.51, 400 IM 3:58.72 / 1973: 200 Fly 1:48.49
  • Other: 1971 Swimmer of the Year / 3x Champion 400 IM

Brendan Hansen

University of Texas – Haverford Township, PA
The three-time Olympic gold medalist, Hansen was the first (and to date, only) man to go eight for eight in NCAA breaststroke events. Along the way he helped the Longhorns to five relay and three team titles. In 2003 he was named CSCAA Swimmer-of-the-Year with NCAA records in the 100 and 200 breaststroke events and capped his career a year later with NCAA records in both events.

  • National Titles: 2001: 100 Breast 52.35, 200 Breast 1:53.11 / 2002: 100 Breast 52.47, 200 Breast 1:52.88 / 2003: 100 Breast 51.96, 200 Breast 1:52.62 / 2004: 100m Breast 58.19, 200m Breast 2:04.73
  • Other: 2003 Swimmer of the Year / 4x Champion 100 Breast, 4x Champion 200 Breast

Bruce Harlan

The University of Ohio State – Landsdowne, PA
Not only was Harlan a prominent member of the Buckeye diving team, he lettered twice with the gymnastics team. The versatile athlete was a five-time NCAA Champion and helped the Buckeyes to three Big Ten and NCAA team titles. In 1948 Harlan captured Olympic Gold and Silver and two years later received the 1950 Big Ten Medal of Honor.

  • National Titles: 1948: 1 Meter 163.87 / 1949: 1 Meter 142.41, 3 Meter 152.37 / 1950: 1 Meter 145, 3 Meter 153.65
  • Other: 1949 & 1950 Diver of the Year / 3x 1m Champion

Robert Hauck

St. Olaf College – Madison, MN
Hauck was a 23-time All-American and seven-time NCAA champion. Between 1984 and 1987 he set national records in the 100 and 200 backstroke as well as the 400 individual medley. Hauck was one of the pioneering Division III swimmers to qualify for the United States Olympic Team Trials and one of the rare persons to be named both the CSCAA Division III Swimmer-of-the-Year (1987) and Coach-of-the-Year (2009).

  • National Titles: 1984: 200 Back 1:52.65, 200 IM 1:52.47 / 1985: 200 Back 1:51.21 / 1986: 100 Back 51.46, 200 Back 1:52.00 / 1987: 200 Back 1:49.82, 400 IM 3:55.70
  • Other: 4x Champion 200 Back

Tom Haynie

University of Michigan – Iowa
Haynie was one of the pioneers not only for Michigan but the sport of swimming as a whole. He was an All-American in each of his three seasons in Ann Arbor and was a key member of the Wolverines’ first three National Championships. Haynie went on to coach Stanford to eleven conference championships and was later inducted into the Stanford Athletic Hall of Fame.

  • National Titles: 1937: 220 Free 2:11.50, 440 Free 4:51.70 / 1939: 220 Free 2:11.70, 440 Free 4:49.70

Jim Henry

Indiana University – San Antonio, TX
Featuring in the first three of Indiana’s six straight national titles, Henry followed the success of Ken Sitzberger for Indiana diving. In his first season, Henry took the 1968 national title in the 1-meter springboard, then followed the next two seasons with sweeps of the 1- and 3-meter titles. In the 1968 Olympics, Henry won bronze in the 3-meter springboard.

  • National Titles: 1968: 1 Meter 512.05 / 1969: 1 Meter 531.06, 3 Meter 574.68 / 1970: 1 Meter 487.56, 3 Meter 550.59
  • Other: 1969 & 1970 Diver of the Year / 3x 1m Champion

Charlie Hickcox

Indiana University – Phoenix, AZ
A member of Indiana’s first two national championship squads, Hickcox featured most prominently in the backstroke events in which he won five NCAA titles. Hickcox also won the 200 individual medley twice and took part in Indiana’s 1969 national championship 400 medley relay team. Internationally, he won three Olympic and two Pan-American gold medals

  • National Titles: 1967: 100 Back 53.17, 200 Back 1:55.30 / 1968: 100 Back 52.18, 200 Back 1:54.66, 200 IM 1:52.56 / 1969: 200 Back 1:53.67, 200 IM 1:54.43
  • Other: 1968 Swimmer of the Year / 3x Champion 200 Back

Richard Howell

Northwestern University – Chicago, IL
During two years of competition, Howell captured three NCAA titles, and at one time held 10 Big Ten freestyle marks. Howell captured NCAA titles in the 220 freestyle, 400 freestyle, and 1500-meter freestyles and was named All-Big Ten Conference in every freestyle distance between 40 and 440 yards. Howell, along with teammate Ralph Breyer, captured the 800-meter freestyle relay gold medal at the 1924 Olympics.

  • National Titles: 1924: 400m Free 5:28.90, 1500m Free 22.41 / 1925: 220 Free 2:23.70

Tracy Huth

Oakland University – Yakima, WA
As a student-athlete, Huth was named CSCAA Division II Swimmer-of-the-Year three times before coaching the Grizzlies to five NCAA titles. Huth holds the distinction of being the only college swimmer, male or female, to have won the 200 and 400 individual medley in each of his four seasons.

  • National Titles: 1981: 200 IM 1:53.58, 400 IM 4:03.03 / 1982: 200 IM 1:54.00, 400 IM 4:02.47 / 1983: 200 IM 1:53.05, 400 IM 4:02.90 / 1984: 200 IM 1:52.39, 400 IM 4:00.17
  • Other: 4x Champion 200 IM, 4x Champion 400 IM

Steven Jackman

University of Minnesota – Rochester, MN
Dubbed the “Fastest Man in the World,” Jackman was an 11-time All-American and won four individual NCAA and eight Big Ten gold medals. Jackman won the 1961 NCAA title in the 100 freestyle, setting the U.S. record in the process, swept the 50 and 100 freestyle a year later and finished his career with another win in 50 freestyle..

  • National Titles: 1961: 100 Free 48.5 / 1962: 50 Free 21.1, 100 Free 47.5 / 1963: 50 Free 21.2

Robert Jackson

University of Puget Sound – Gig Harbor, WA
Jackson was the first NCAA Division II athlete to be named first-team All-American in both football and swimming. Jackson was a seven-time NCAA Division II national champion, a record holder in breaststroke events, and also represented the U.S. in the 1980 World University Games.

  • National Titles: 1979: 100 Breast 57.45 / 1980: 100 Breast 55.22, 200 Breast 2:03.42 / 1981: 100 Breast 55.15, 200 Breast 2:02.96 / 1982: 100 Breast 55.4, 200 Breast 2:05.24
  • Other: 4x Champion 100 Breast, 3x Champion 200 Breast

Steele Johnson

Purdue University – Carmel, IN
One of the very few divers to capture NCAA titles in each of the three events, Johnson finished his career with five NCAA titles and a pair of runner-up finishes. The 2015 and 2017 CSCAA Diver-of-the-Year, he also teamed up with fellow Boilermaker, David Boudia, to win silver in synchronized 10-meter at the 2016 Olympic Games.

  • National Titles: 2015: 1 Meter 748.15, Platform 852.7 / 2017: 1 Meter 726.9, 3 Meter 822.2 / 2018: 3 Meter 819.35
  • Other: 2015 & 2017 Diver of the Year

Matthew Josa

Queens University of Charlotte – Charlotte, NC
In just two years with his hometown Royals, Josa’s dozen All-America honors were highlighted by seven individual titles including four in 2015. That same year Josa helped Queens to their first NCAA Division II team title and was named CSCAA Swimmer-of-the-Year. Josa finished his career by earning All-America honors in the 100 butterfly 400 medley relay and 800 freestyle relay for the University of California.

  • National Titles: 2014: 200 Back 1:40.74, 100 Fly 45.45, 200 IM 1:43.96 / 2015: 200 Back 1:41.45, 100 Fly 44.89, 200 Fly 1:42.96, 200 IM 1:41.94
  • Other: 2014 & 2015 Division 2 Swimmer of the Year

John Kinsella

Indiana University – Oak Park, IL
Taking part in three Indiana national championships from 1971-73, Kinsella captured the NCAA titles in the 500 freestyle and 1650 freestyle in each of these three seasons. As a senior, Kinsella also helped the Hoosiers capture the 800 freestyle relay. He did the same for Team USA at the 1972 Summer Olympics.

  • National Titles: 1971: 500 Free 4:27.39, 1650 Free 15:26.51 / 1972: 500 Free 4:24.50, 1650 Free 15:33.58 / 1973: 500 Free 4:27.59, 1650 Free 15:29.21
  • Other: 3x Champion 1650 Free

George Kojac

Rutgers University – New York, NY
Kojak never lost a race in a dual meet in his college career and captured a total of seven NCAA Championships He captured the Intercollegiate Swimming Association’s 100 and 200 freestyles in 1931 and also held the world and intercollegiate records in the three different events. A two-time Olympic gold medalist, Kojak is a member of the International Swimming Hall of Fame.

  • National Titles: 1929: 150 Back 1:38.40 / 1930: 150 Back, 150 IM 1:40.60 / 1931: 100 Free 52.6

Ford Konno

The University of Ohio State – Honolulu, HI
Konno, a distance freestyler, won 31 major titles during his brilliant Ohio State career. Konno won three straight NCAA titles in the 440 freestyle and 1500-meter freestyle, added nine Big Ten titles and 16 NAAU. He also set five world records and won a Gold Medal at the 1952 Olympics

  • National Titles: 1952: 440 Free 4:30.30, 1500m Free 18:15.50 / 1954: 440 Free 4:28.60, 1500m Free 18:14.40 / 1955: 440 Free 4:31.10, 1500m Free 18:16.10
  • Other: 3x Champion 1650 Free, 3x Champion 500 Free

Jeff Kostoff

Stanford University – Upland, CA
A 1987 graduate, Kostoff captured five individual NCAA titles, three in the 1650 freestyle and two in the 400 individual medley. A two-time Olympian, Kostoff set a dozen American Records and helped the Cardinal capture three NCAA and four Pac-10 team championships.

  • National Titles: 1984: 1650 Free 14:38.22 / 1985: 400 IM 3:47.11 / 1986: 1650 Free 14:37.87 / 1987: 1650 Free 14:47.75, 400 IM 3:47.40
  • Other: 3x Champion 1650 Free

Marius Kusch

Queens University of Charlotte – Kassel, Germany
With 11, Kusch is tied with Jakub Jiracek and Pablo Morales for the most individual NCAA titles among men. Kusch was a three-time CSCAA and Bluegrass Mountain Conference Swimmer-of-the-Year and set six NCAA Division II records over his storied career. In 2020 Kusch was selected to represent Germany at the 2020 Olympic Games.

  • National Titles: 2017: 100 Free 43.03, 200 Fly 1:42.04, 200 IM 1:44.36 / 2018: 100 Free 42.42, 200 Free 1:32.74, 200 Fly 1:42.16, 200 IM 1:41.61 / 2019: 100 Free 41.73, 100 Back 45.09, 100 Fly 44.32, 200 IM 1:42.53
  • Other: 2017, 2018 & 2019 Division 2 Swimmer of the Year / 3x Champion 100 Free, 3x Champion 200 IM

Will Licon

University of Texas – El Paso, TX
Licon was an 11-time NCAA Champion (seven individual, four relay) who earned 15 All-American honors over his career. He captured a dozen Big 12 titles, held six Big 12 records and at the 2016 NCAA Championships set NCAA, American, US Open, NCAA records in the 200 breaststroke.

  • National Titles: 2015: 200 Breast 1:49.48, 400 IM 3:36.37 / 2016: 200 Breast 1:48.12, 200 IM 1:40.04 / 2017: 100 Breast 50.68, 200 Breast 1:47.91, 200 IM 1:40.67
  • Other: 3x Champion 200 Breast

Ryan Lochte

University of Florida – Daytona Beach, FL
A seven-time NCAA champion, Lochte was twice named the CSCAA Swimmer-of-the-Year. At the 2006 NCAA Championships, he captured three national titles, setting US Open and American records in the 200 individual medley and 200 backstroke and breaking Tom Dolan’s nearly decade-old NCAA record in the 400 individual medley. Lochte went on to win twelve Olympic medals, tied for second-most in Olympic swimming history.

  • National Titles: 2004: 400m IM 4:04.52 / 2005: 200 Back 1:38.37, 200 IM 1:41.71 / 2006: 200 Back 1:37.68, 200 IM 1:40.55, 400 IM 3:38.15
  • Other: 2005 & 2006 Swimmer of the Year

Steve Lundquist

Southern Methodist University – Jonesboro, GA
Lundquist is an eight-time NCAA Champion and 12-time individual All-American and nine-time conference champion. A two-time Olympic Gold Medalist, he was named the 1982 United States Swimmer-of-the-Year. He was elected into the International Swimming Hall of Fame in 1990 and the SMU Athletics Hall of Fame in 2009.

  • National Titles: 1980: 100 Breast 53.59 / 1981: 100 Breast 52.93, 200 Breast 1:55.01 / 1982: 100 Breast 53.09, 200 Breast 1:56.84 / 1983: 100 Breast 52.48, 200 IM 1:45.54
  • Other: 4x Champion 100 Breast

Mike Martin

University of California-Irvine – Newport Beach, CA
Despite not competing in age-group swimming or water polo, Martin-Sherrill earned collegiate All-America honors in both sports. At UCI, he captured ten individual national championships and was on six championship relays. His efforts helped the Anteaters earn three national titles in men’s swimming and in 1970 helped the Anteaters defeat UCLA in sudden-death overtime for the NCAA water polo.

  • National Titles: 1968: 500 Free 4:46.45 / 1969: 200 Free 1:44.83, 500 Free 4:41.36, 1650 Free 16:37.23 / 1970: 200 Free 1:43.96, 500 Free 4:43.17, 1650 Free 16:25.22 / 1971: 200 Free 1:43.79, 500 Free 4:43.51, 1650 Free 16:37.82
  • Other: 1970 Division 2 Swimmer of the Year / 3x Champion 1650 Free, 3x Champion 200 Free

Nick McCrory

Duke University – Chapel Hill, NC
McCrory enjoyed a historic career at Duke, becoming the first (and only) diver to win four NCAA titles in platform diving. McCrory concluded his career as a 2012 Olympic Bronze medalist in synchronized 10-meter platform, a four-time national champion, an 11-time All-American, a 10-time ACC Champion, an 11-time All-ACC selection and four-time ACC Men’s Diver-of-the-Year.

  • National Titles: 2010: Platform 534 / 2011: Platform 908.9 / 2013: Platform 495.9 / 2014: Platform 734.85
  • Other: 4x Champion Platform

Jack Medica

University of Washington – Seattle, WA
An unstoppable freestyle force, Medica is the most-accomplished athlete in Washington history winning the NCAA 220, 440, and 1500-meter freestyle titles in each year. His nine individual NCAA titles stood was only surpassed after freshmen were permitted to compete. Medica won three medals at the 1936 Olympic Games and, at one point or another, held eleven world records.

  • National Titles: 1934: 220 Free 2:13.20, 440 Free 4:46.80, 1500m Free 19:12.10 / 1935: 220 Free 2:11.50, 440 Free 4:42.50, 1500m Free 18:59.30 / 1936: 220 Free 2:09.60, 440 Free 4:44.60, 1500m Free 20:23.70
  • Other: 1934, 1935 & 1936 Swimmer of the Year / 3x Champion 1650 Free, 3x Champion 220 free, 3x Champion 440 free

Ben Michaelson

Southern Connecticut State University – Seymour, CT
One of the most decorated swimmers in Division II history, Michaelson was a three-time CSCAA Swimmer-of-the-Year. Michaelson set eight NCAA records and his ten individual NCAA titles are tied for second-most in Division II. A three-time champion in both the 100 and 200 butterfly events, he finished his collegiate career with twenty All-America honors and a pair of Pan American gold medals.

  • National Titles: 2001: 100 Fly 47.77, 200 Fly 1:48.21 / 2002: 50 Free 20.11, 100 Free 44.24, 100 Fly 46.74, 200 Fly 1:45.25 / 2003: 50 Free 19.93, 100 Free 43.73, 100 Fly 45.6, 200 Fly 1:43.30
  • Other: 2002 & 2003 Division 2 Swimmer of the Year / 3x Champion 100 Fly, 3x Champion 200 Fly

Travis Miller

University of California-San Diego – San Marino, CA
Miller captured nine individual NCAA Division III titles in four different events for the Tritons. In 1993 his six titles (three individual, three relay) set the standard for the most men’s titles in a single year (since surpassed) and earned him his first of two CSCAA Division III Swimmer-of-the-Year awards. He graduated having set five NCAA Division III records.

  • National Titles: 1991: 100 Back 51.41, 200 Back 1:51.32 / 1992: 200 Back 1:49.93 / 1993: 200 Back 1:48.48, 100 Fly 49.49, 200 IM 1:50.13 / 1994: 100 Back 50.29, 200 Back 1:48.13, 200 IM 1:50.66
  • Other: 1993 & 1994 Division 3 Swimmer of the Year / 4x Champion 200 Back

Bill Milne

Johns Hopkins University – ,
Milne was one of the most-dominant butterfliers of small college history. In his four years, Milne swept the 100 butterfly and captured a trio of 200 butterfly titles. As a junior, Milne established NCAA Small College records in both events, added a title in the 200 individual medley and was named CSCAA Swimmer-of-the-Year.

  • National Titles: 1971: 100 Fly 52.45 / 1972: 100 Fly 51.99, 200 Fly 1:55.78 / 1973: 100 Fly 51.157, 200 Fly 1:53.35, 200 IM 1:57.41 / 1974: 100 Fly 51.908, 200 Fly 1:53.06, 200 IM 1:57.93
  • Other: 1973 Division 2 Swimmer of the Year / 4x Champion 100 Fly, 3x Champion 200 Fly

Tim Moore

The University of Ohio State – Larchmont, NY
An eight-time All-American, Moore won five NCAA and seven Big Ten Championships en-route to 21 major titles. Moore claimed seven Big Ten diving titles, was a member of the 1976 Olympic Team, and was honored as one of the NCAA’s top five scholar-athletes as a senior.

  • National Titles: 1973: 1 Meter 487.9, 3 Meter 539.61 / 1974: 1 Meter 494.25 / 1975: 1 Meter 502.71, 3 Meter 590.61
  • Other: 1973 & 1975 Diver of the Year / 3x 1m Champion

Pablo Morales

Stanford University – Chicago, IL
Pablo Morales is largely acknowledged as the most-decorated intercollegiate swimmer in history. In addition to helping Stanford win three NCAA team championships, he also helped the Cardinal capture three NCAA Water Polo titles. While at Stanford, the four-time Olympic medalist led the men’s team to a 54-1 dual-meet record, four Pac-10 team titles. He was inducted into the International Swimming Hall of Fame in 1988.

  • National Titles: 1984: 100 Fly 47.02, 200 Fly 1:44.33 / 1985: 100 Fly 46.52, 200 Fly 1:42.85, 200 IM 1:46.08 / 1986: 100 Fly 46.37, 200 Fly 1:43.05, 200 IM 1:45.43 / 1987: 100 Fly 46.47, 200 Fly 1:42.60, 200 IM 1:45.42
  • Other: 1985 Swimmer of the Year / 4x Champion 100 Fly, 4x Champion 200 Fly, 3x Champion 200 IM

Dennis Mulvihill

Kenyon College – East Grand Rapids, MI
The 1987 and 1988 CSCAA Swimmer-of-the-Year, Mulvihill collected seven individual NCAA titles and established seven Division III records in the process. Over his career, he collected twenty-three All-America honors and is one of the very few athletes to earn honors in both Divisions I and III having finished 15th in the 200 freestyle at the 1988 NCAA Men’s Division I Championships.

  • National Titles: 1985: 500 Free 4:33.06 / 1986: 200 Free 1:39.83 / 1987: 200 Free 1:37.43, 500 Free 4:25.05 / 1988: 200 Free 1:37.09, 500 Free 4:24.54, 200 Back 1:52.62
  • Other: 1987 & 1988 Division 3 Swimmer of the Year / 3x Champion 200 Free

Ryan Murphy

University of California – Ponte Vedra, FL
Cal swimmer Ryan Murphy dominated the backstroke during his time at Berkeley. He swept NCAA titles all four years in both backstroke events, one of the most stunning achievements in college swimming.

  • National Titles: 2014: 100 Back 44.63, 200 Back 1:37.35 / 2015: 100 Back 44.21, 200 Back 1:36.77 / 2016: 100 Back 43.49, 200 Back 1:35.73 / 2017: 100 Back 43.99, 200 Back 1:36.75
  • Other: 2016 Co-Swimmer of the Year / 4x Champion 100 Back, 4x Champion 200 Back

John Naber

University of Southern California – Evanston, IN
Unbeaten in the backstroke events over his four years, Naber won ten individual and five NCAA relay titles as a Trojan. Naber’s efforts helped USC to four consecutive NCAA team titles. As a 14-time All-American and nine-time individual Pac-10 Champion, he earned a spot on the Pac-12’s All-Century team and received the NCAA Silver Anniversary Award in 2002.

  • National Titles: 1974: 500 Free 4:26.86, 100 Back 50.516, 200 Back 1:48.95 / 1975: 500 Free 4:20.45, 100 Back 49.947, 200 Back 1:46.83 / 1976: 100 Back 49.94, 200 Back 1:46.96 / 1977: 100 Back 49.36, 200 Back 1:46.09
  • Other: 1974 & 1975 Swimmer of the Year / 4x Champion 100 Back, 4x Champion 200 Back

Keo Nakama

The University of Ohio State – Honolulu, HI
An All-American distance freestyler, Nakama captured four NCAA, six Big Ten, and nine AAU titles. Nakama was a vital contributor to Ohio State’s 1943 and 1945 national championship-winning teams. The two-sport star was also a third baseman for the Buckeyes’ 1943 Big Ten Championship team and is the only person in the modern history of Ohio State to captain two varsity teams in the same year.

  • National Titles: 1943: 440 Free 4:43.20, 1500m Free 19:18.60 / 1944: 440 Free 4:47.00, 1500m Free 20:02.20
  • Other: 1943 Swimmer of the Year

Ryk Neethling

University of Arizona – Bloemfontein, South Africa
Neethling was a nine-time NCAA Individual champion, four-time Pac-10 swimmer-of-the-Year, 17-time All-American, and 1999 CSCAA Swimmer-of-the-Year. His nine individual NCAA titles is tied for third-most in men’s Division I history behind only Pablo Morales and John Naber. Neethling was the first South African to compete in four Olympic games and, in 2004, helped them win gold in the 400-meter freestyle relay.

  • National Titles: 1997: 1650 Free 14:43.44 / 1998: 200 Free 1:34.19, 500 Free 4:13.42, 1650 Free 14:32.50 / 1999: 200 Free 1:33.59, 500 Free 4:13.80, 1650 Free 14:35.57 / 2000: 200m Free 1:43.90, 400m Free 3:40.47
  • Other: 1999 Swimmer of the Year / 3x Champion 1650 Free, 3x Champion 200 Free, 3x Champion 500 Free

Yoshi Oyakawa

The University of Ohio State – Hawaii
For three years the Buckeyes were undefeated in the 300 medley relay with Oyakawa leading off. In his career, he claimed seven NCAA, six Big Ten, and nine AAU titles. He competed on four Big Ten and three NCAA Championship teams, set a world record in 1954 and participated in the 1952 and 1956 Olympics.

  • National Titles: 1952: 200 Back 2:07.30 / 1953: 100 Back 56.9, 200 Back 2:05.10 / 1954: 100 Back 57, 200 Back 2:09.80 / 1955: 100 Back 58, 200 Back 2:07.70
  • Other: 3x 100 Back Champion, 4x Champion 200 Back

Al Patnik

The University of Ohio State – Cleveland, OH
One of Ohio State’s first diving greats, Patnik dominated college diving in the late 1930s. Between 1938 and 1940, Patnik won three consecutive NCAA one-meter titles and two three-meter crowns. He also won three Big Ten titles in fancy diving. He was inducted into the International Swimming Hall of Fame in 1969.

  • National Titles: 1938: 1 Meter 145.14, 3 Meter 143.92 / 1939: 1 Meter 131.08, 3 Meter 161.34 / 1940: 1 Meter 147.04
  • Other: 1938 & 1939 Diver of the Year / 3x 1m Champion

Daniel Ramirez

Oklahoma Baptist University – Brownsville, TX
Ramirez made his mark on a fledgling swimming and diving program and turned into one of sport’s greats. He was a three-time NAIA Outstanding Swimmer-of-the-Year and helped the Bisons to four NAIA team titles. He won nine individual and ten relay national championships.

  • National Titles: 2013: 100 Free 43.42, 100 Back 47.61, 200 IM 1:50.19 / 2014: 100 Free 42.53, 100 Back 46.28, 100 Fly 46.13 / 2015: 100 Free 43.79, 100 Back 46.88, 100 Fly 46.12
  • Other: 2013, 2014 & 2015 NAIA Swimmer of the Year / 3x 100 Back Champion, 3x Champion 100 Free

Carl Robie

University of Michigan – Darby, PA
Robie won three national titles while swimming in Ann Arbor, winning the 200 butterfly in 1966 and 1967 and the 400 individual medley in 1965. The “Philadelphia Flyer” won a gold medal at the 1968 Mexico City Olympics in the 200-meter butterfly and broke the men’s 200-meter World Record four times during his career.

  • National Titles: 1965: 400 IM 4:16.60 / 1966: 200 Fly 1:53.80 / 1967: 200 Fly 1:52.59

Murray Rose

University of Southern California – Birmingham, Great Britain
Rose contributed to USC’s 1960 NCAA Team title, was a five-time NCAA champion and seven-time All-American while at USC. In 1961 Rose earned Swimmer-of-the-Year honors after sweeping the 220, 440 and 1500-meter freestyle. The 1962 team captain, Rose won eight Pac-10 titles, eight AAU meet titles and was named to the Pac-12 All-Century Team in 2016.

  • National Titles: 1961: 220 Free 2:00.60, 440 Free 4:17.90, 1500m Free 17:21.80 / 1962: 440 Free 4:20.00, 1500m Free 17:26.70
  • Other: 1961 Swimmer of the Year

Jeff Rouse

Stanford University – Fredericksburg, VA
A 1992 graduate, Rouse captained Stanford to an NCAA championship in 1992 and won seven NCAA event Championships during his career. Rouse captured either the 100 or 200 backstroke in each of his first three years before sweeping both and adding a 200 individual medley title to a season that saw him named CSCAA Swimmer-of-the-Year.

  • National Titles: 1989: 200 Back 1:44.87 / 1990: 100 Back 47.5 / 1991: 100 Back 46.99 / 1992: 100 Back 46.12, 200 Back 1:40.64, 200 IM 1:45.81
  • Other: 1992 Swimmer of the Year / 3x 100 Back Champion

Arthur Rule

United States Naval Academy – Pottersville, NJ
Rule first learned to swim freestyle and backstroke as a Midshipman and quickly became successful, winning NCAA titles in the 100-meter backstroke at the 1924 championship and 50 freestyle and 150 backstroke a year later. A 6’4″ powerhouse, Rule was also a center on the basketball team, known for scoring goals early before leaving to swim in a simultaneous aquatic competition.

  • National Titles: 1924: 100m Back 1:19.00 / 1925: 50 Free 23.9, 150 Back 1:49.00
  • Other: 1925 Swimmer of the Year

Roy Saari

University of Southern California – Buffalo, NY
Saari helped the Trojans to three NCAA team titles, was a nine-time NCAA individual Champion and two-time NCAA relay champion while competing at USC. Saari won three individual events in each of the 1964, 1965 and 1966 seasons and finished his career with fourteen All-America honors and eight conference titles (six individual, two relay). In 2016 he was selected to the Pac-12 All-Century Team.

  • National Titles: 1964: 500 Free 4:45.80, 1650 Free 16:49.50, 200 IM 1:56.70 / 1965: 200 Free 1:42.90, 500 Free 4:43.60, 1650 Free 16:39.90 / 1966: 200 Free 1:44.66, 500 Free 4:50.59, 1650 Free 17:08.17
  • Other: 1964, 1965 & 1966 Swimmer of the Year / 3x Champion 1650 Free

Joseph Schooling

University of Texas – Singapore
A seven-time All-American, Schooling captured four individual NCAA titles in the butterfly events. As a sophomore, he set NCAA and US Open records in both the 100 and 200 butterfly events and shared the CSCAA Swimmer-of-the-Year award with high school teammates Caeleb Dressel and Ryan Murphy. In 2016 Schooling became Singapore’s first ever Olympic gold medalist when he captured the 100 butterfly with an Olympic Record.

  • National Titles: 2015: 100 Fly 44.51, 200 Fly 1:39.62 / 2016: 100 Fly 44.01, 200 Fly 1:37.97
  • Other: 2016 Co-Swimmer of the Year

Al Schwartz

Northwestern University – Chicago, IL
One of the nation’s most-outstanding freestylers, Schwartz became the first swimmer to win three events at the NCAA Championships when he captured the 50, 100 and 220 freestyles in 1930. Schwartz later won the bronze medal in the men’s 100-meter freestyle at the 1932 Olympics and at one time he held all national records between 220 and 550 yards.

  • National Titles: 1929: 100 Free 53.2 / 1930: 50 Free 24, 100 Free 55, 220 Free 2:16.60
  • Other: 1930 Swimmer of the Year

Bud Shields

Brigham Young University – Stockton, UT
A four-time All-American, Shields won two NCAA titles in 1928, while breaking the NCAA and National records in the 220 and 440 freestyles. He repeated the feat the following year while resetting his NCAA records. Shields amassed the most individual points in the 1928 and 1929 NCAA meets, earning him Outstanding Swimmer honors both years.

  • National Titles: 1928: 220 Free 2:19.80, 440 Free 5:08.20 / 1929: 220 Free 2:19.20, 440 Free 4:57.80
  • Other: 1928 & 1929 Swimmer of the Year

Tom Shields

University of California – Huntington Beach, CA
An 11-time NCAA champion, Murphy swept the 100 and 200 backstroke in each of his four seasons. Over his career, Murphy was named Pac-12 Swimmer-of-the-Year three times, CSCAA Swimmer-of-the-Year twice, first-team Academic All-American and the Pac-12 men’s swimming Scholar-Athlete-of-the-Year. The two-time Olympian is a six-time medalist highlighted by a sweep of the 100 and 200 backstroke at the Rio Games.

  • National Titles: 2010: 100 Fly 44.91 / 2011: 100 Back 45.02 / 2012: 100 Back 44.86, 100 Fly 44.76 / 2013: 100 Fly 44.59, 200 Fly 1:39.65
  • Other: 2012 Swimmer of the Year / 3x Champion 100 Fly

Ken Sitzberger

Indiana University – Cedar Rapids, IA
Sitzberger helped lay the foundation for diving success at Indiana University. The Hoosiers’ first NCAA 3-meter springboard champion, Sitzberger won again a year later. Sitzberger was also a national champion in the 1-Meter all three years and helped the Hoosiers to two runner-up finishes at the NCAA Championships. He captured gold at the 1964 Olympics and was inducted into the International Swimming Hall of Fame in 1994.

  • National Titles: 1965: 1 Meter 511.25, 3 Meter 565.05 / 1966: 1 Meter 488.5 / 1967: 1 Meter 510.25, 3 Meter 572.4
  • Other: 1965 & 1967 Diver of the Year / 3x 1m Champion

William Smiddy

Johns Hopkins University
A two-time CSCAA Swimmer-of-the-Year, Smiddy captured eight individual NCAA titles highlighted by a three-year run of dominance in the 200 individual medley. He earned seventeen All-America honors and won six MAC titles in helping lead Johns Hopkins to three straight NCAA team championships.

  • National Titles: 1977: 100 Breast 59.38, 200 Breast 2:07.16, 200 IM 1:55.80 / 1978: 100 Breast 59.051, 200 Breast 2:06.88, 200 IM 1:56.30 / 1979: 200 IM 1:56.01, 400 IM 4:08.76
  • Other: 1977 & 1978 Division 3 Swimmer of the Year / 3x Champion 200 IM

Bill Smith

The University of Ohio State – Honolulu, Hawaii
Smith holds the distinction of the greatest span between NCAA titles. He captured his first win (220 freestyle) in 1943. In 1946 he returned from military service to claim three consecutive titles in the 220 and 440 freestyle. The three-time Big Ten Champion was undefeated in four years of dual meet competition, captured two Gold Medals at the 1948 Olympic Games and set seven world records.

  • National Titles: 1943: 220 Free 2:09.80 / 1947: 220 Free 2:10.40, 440 Free 4:45.20 / 1948: 220 Free 2:09.50, 440 Free 4:43.80 / 1949: 220 Free 2:08.50, 440 Free 4:42.60
  • Other: 1948 & 1949 Swimmer of the Year / 4x Champion 220 free, 3x Champion 440 free

Graham Smith

University of California – Edmonton, Canada
A member of eleven United States National Teams, the versatile Shields captured seven individual titles across three different events and helped California to six relay titles. A two-time Olympian, Shields has earned gold medals at both the Olympic Games and World Championships.

  • National Titles: 1977: 100 Breast 55.1, 200 Breast 2:00.05 / 1978: 200 Breast 2:00.05 / 1979: 100 Breast 54.91, 200 Breast 2:00.37, 200 IM 1:48.44
  • Other: 3x Champion 200 Breast

Mark Spitz

Indiana University – Modesta, CA
Calling the choice of Indiana “the biggest decision of my life (and) the best,” Spitz, a nine-time Olympic champion, captured eight individual NCAA titles over his career. Spitz was a part of the first class eligible to compete as freshmen and turned it into four consecutive NCAA titles in the 100 butterfly. Spitz was named the 1971 Sullivan Award winner and helped the Hoosiers to four NCAA championships.

  • National Titles: 1969: 200 Free 1:39.53, 500 Free 4:33.48, 100 Fly 49.69 / 1970: 100 Fly 49.82 / 1971: 100 Fly 49.42, 200 Fly 1:50.10 / 1972: 100 Fly 47.988, 200 Fly 1:46.90
  • Other: 1969 Swimmer of the Year / 4x Champion 100 Fly

Bob Thomas

Eastern Illinois University
Thomas’ ten NCAA titles are the most in Eastern Illinois history. He earned twelve All-American honors and at one time held the NCAA Division II record in both the 200 backstroke and 400 individual medley. Six of Thomas’ national titles came in the 100 and 200 backstroke in the NAIA. Four more championships were in the 100 and 200 backstroke and 400 individual medley between 1971-74.

  • National Titles: 1971: 100 Back 55.94, 200 Back 1:59.20 / 1972: 100 Back 54.9, 200 Back 1:58.63, 200 IM 1:59.09 / 1973: 200 Back 1:57.20, 400 IM 4:12.44 / 1974: 100 Back 53.86, 200 Back 1:56.58, 400 IM 4:12.78
  • Other: 1974 Division 2 Swimmer of the Year / 3x 100 Back Champion, 4x Champion 200 Back

Peter Vanderkaay

University of Michigan – Royal Oak, MI
Vanderkaay won four individual NCAA Championships during his career and went on to represent the United States in three Olympic Games. Vanderkaay captured nine individual Big Ten titles and was twice named Big Ten Swimmer-of-the-Year. In his final individual NCAA title, the Michigan native broke Tom Dolan’s eleven-year-old American Record in the 50 freestyle.

  • National Titles: 2004: 400m Free 3:40.78, 1500m Free 14:44.53 / 2005: 500 Free 4:09.82 / 2006: 500 Free 4:08.60
  • Other: 3x Champion 500 Free

Mark VanderMey

Oakland University – Grandville, MI
VanderMey was a three-time NCAA Champion and 28-time All-American at Oakland. A former member of the USA National team, he was named CSCAA Division II Swimmer-of-the-Year in 1988 after capturing the 100 and 200 breaststrokes and 200 individual medley.

  • National Titles: 1986: 100 Breast 56.92 / 1987: 100 Breast 55.59 / 1988: 100 Breast 55.17, 200 Breast 1:59.19, 200 IM 1:50.31
  • Other: 1988 Division 2 Swimmer of the Year / 3x Champion 100 Breast

Lou Vitucci

The University of Ohio State – Mount Vernon, NY
Vitucci was a five-time NCAA Champion. He captured the 3-meter springboard three times and added a pair of 1-meter springboard championships. Despite not being contested in college, Vitucci also competed as a platform diver where he represented the United States at the 1963 Pan Am and 1964 Olympic Games

  • National Titles: 1961: 3 Meter 491.65 / 1962: 1 Meter 470.5, 3 Meter 491.65 / 1963: 1 Meter 489.7, 3 Meter 496.9
  • Other: 1962 & 1963 Diver of the Year / 3x Champion 3 Meter

Allen Weik

Denison University – Lebanon, PA
Weik earned his spot among the most-dominating distance freestylers, in small college swimmers’ history, through a tenacious work ethic. Over the course of his career, Weik swept the 1650 freestyle all four years, twice in record time. Weik was also a two-time champion in the 500 freestyle.

  • National Titles: 2011: 1650 Free 15:06.47 / 2012: 500 Free 4:21.79, 1650 Free 15:04.85 / 2013: 500 Free 4:23.99, 1650 Free 15:09.63 / 2014: 500 Free 4:24.31, 1650 Free 15:05.60
  • Other: 4x Champion 1650 Free

David Wharton

University of Southern California – Albington Township, PA
Wharton was a seven-time NCAA individual champion and 20-time All-American. He captured three titles in the 200 individual medley and four-straight wins in the 400 individual medley. A four-time Pac-10 Male Swimmer-of-the-Year, Swimming World 1987 American Swimmer-of-the-Year and four-time Pac-10 champion (three individual, one relay). Wharton was selected to the Pac-12 All-Century Team.

  • National Titles: 1988: 200 IM 1:45.04, 400 IM 3:42.23 / 1989: 200 IM 1:44.70, 400 IM 3:44.69 / 1990: 200 IM 1:44.99, 400 IM 3:43.62 / 1991: 400 IM 3:43.28
  • Other: 3x Champion 200 IM, 4x Champion 400 IM

Andrew Wilson

Emory University – Bethesda, MD
En route to Emory’s first-ever men’s NCAA team title, Wilson put together one of the greatest careers of any Division III athlete in any sport. Over the course of his career, Wilson was a two-time CSCAA and UAA Swimmer-of-the-Year, a 10-time national champion, and 17-time All-American. He went on to became the first-ever Division III swimmer to represent the United States at the Olympic games

  • National Titles: 2015: 100 Breast 51.72, 200 Breast 1:52.97, 200 IM 1:46.23 / 2017: 100 Breast 50.94, 200 Breast 1:50.80, 200 IM 1:44.18
  • Other: 2015 & 2017 Division 3 Swimmer of the Year

Artur Wojdat

University of Iowa – Olsztyn, Warmian-Masurian, Poland
Wojdat is the most-decorated athlete in University of Iowa history, having captured nine individual NCAA titles and earning eighteen All-American honors. The two-time Olympian captured the 500 free in each of his four seasons and won the 1650 freestyle three times.

 

— The above press release was posted by Swimming World in conjunction with the CSCAA. For press releases and advertising inquiries please contact [email protected].

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